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drjanik

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Reply with quote  #16 
I've often wondered what it would be like to co-author a work. What's it like working with A. G. Hayes?
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #17 
Absolutely Dan. ONE NIGHT IN BANGKOK is a story about Miles Devereaux, an everyday man from 2005 New Orleans who wakes up one evening on an airplane as it descends into the lavish and sprawling metropolis of Bangkok, Thailand. Little does he know he has awakened 60 years in the future! Before he knows it he is on a non-stop sci-fi adventure, thrust into a real-life game of chess...

Here is an excerpt from chapter 1:

       [He had just awakened from what seemed like several hours of sleep. He stretched his toes in his shoes and tried his best to stretch his arms without disturbing the person sitting next to him. As he tried to shake the sleep from his eyes, he slowly noticed his surroundings. The seats in front of him were much further away than normal. He tried to remember if he had been moved up to first class or business class, but he could not. Lots of leg room, he thought to himself. Very nice! Glancing over at his seat companion, he could tell that the enormous man was happy about the ample leg room as well. He was a tremendous man with dark skin and stared straight ahead as if he were in a trance. Miles straightened in his seat and tried not to stare at him. I'd hate to tick this guy off, he thought to himself. He gazed around the cabin but no one was standing and he did not see any flight attendants. He could tell the plane was descending so he assumed they would be landing shortly. What he did notice was the unusual cabin of the aircraft. The length and the width were abundantly large. Larger than any plane he had ever been on before. Wow! he thought. This must be one of those fancy new ones.

Then, he glanced outside the cabin window and did a double-take. With an astonished look on his face, he swirled in his seat and planted both hands and his face on the glass. "Whoa," he exclaimed. He glanced over at the large man next to him, but he did not even acknowledge Miles' excitement. Miles stared out his window in amazement. The city below was enormous. He knew they were still very high in the air, but he had never seen a city from the air at night with such sheer size. The twinkling lights glowed all the way over the horizon and beyond. "Holy cow. Where are we?" he blurted out again. This question did produce a slight head turn from his seatmate. The look on his face implied that it was obvious. How could anyone not know where they were flying?]

Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #18 
First, I have to state that A. G. is an author's author. He's got eight published works including two series ("Koski and Falk" and "Kate Keenan Special Assignment") and what is clearly one of if not the world's first screenplay novels. He's also received multiple awards for his works. Being invited to co-author a work with someone so talented and experienced was a dream come true. 

It also wasn't my first co-authored work. I had the pleasure of working with the pre-eminient author, William Maltese, author of over 250 published works, in TOTAL MELTDOWN (Borgo/Wildside 2011).  

My experience with A. G. was so personally satisfying for both of us that we've tentatively agreed to co-author "The Bridge at Vittorio Veneto," a Koski and Falk story in which they uncover and confront the darker portions of their lives before they met. 
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #19 
Good excerpt, Keith. I can imagine myself in a Boeing 777 "Dreamliner" looking out the window and being taken aback at seeing New York City sitting on the beach at Waikiki 60 years in the future. A poignant thought. Honolulu's often billed as the Hong Kong of the West, or, at least the westernmost city of financial opportunity under American law. 

What made you choose Bangkok? Have you been there before? If not, how did you do your imagineering?
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #20 
That's very funny, Raymond. I would have that same problem here. Yes, I prefer typing myself on my good old computer. We have it easy compared to the old days when author's had to write everything by hand!

Good question, Dan, about the editing versus polishing. Editing is a process led by an editor, such as yourself, or in my case, the talented Helen R. Davis, author CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED. The editor takes the lead in editing the manuscript very closely, one chapter at a time. She gives each chapter back to the author who approves or disapproves those suggestions and then edits his manuscript accordingly.

Once that process is finished, polishing begins. Polishing is more on the author's shoulders, to read through the manuscript very slowly, seeking out additional punctuation errors or missing words that may have been missed in the first round of editing.Then the editor looks over these new changes and gives their approval on it. Where-then the master file is updated by the editor-in-chief. Then that whole process is repeated until it is decided all the errors have been found. So it is a long and meticulous process but is well worth the effort in coming to the finished product.
Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #21 
I agree with Dan. Nice excerpt, Keith. Speaking of which:

QUANTUM DEATH by A. G. Hayes with Raymond Gaynor- Excerpt #2 (This Excerpt is Family Rated):

"Mr. Hempsted. It's Agent Falk," he said working his way through the door and cautiously around to the front of the chair. "I visited you earlier, and was wondering if we might..."

Aaron Hempsted was sitting, head erect, rheumy bloodshot eyes fixed open, staring at Falk, his mouth limply agape, his unshaven face even whiter than before. A bloodless hand gripped each of the threadbare chair arms, making it appear as if he were pushing himself back into the seat. A small rivulet of dark, coagulated blood had worked its way alongside his nose and down one cheek from a small, round entry hole in the middle of his forehead. The man's shocked expression was accentuated by a halo of dark red blood splattered behind the man's resting head onto a white embroidered doily draped over the back of the easy chair.

Falk squatted, raising his weapon and holding it with both hands as he swept the room... 

[12541533-quantum-death-by-hayes-with-raymond-gaynor] 

Multi-award winning author A. G. Hayes studied television writing at UCLA and has published short fiction, "Cover up" - "Not a Penny Pincher” - :Home" - "Payment in Full" - "Small Wonder" - Fate Magazine-"Guided Through a Mine Field" and other scripts to CBS TV and other television productions. He lives in Northern California, and spends his time writing and traveling to nearly every part of the world. He has used personal experiences gained during service with the British intelligence in Eastern Europe and the Middle East to enrich the characters of his protagonist teams. "Quantum Death is a deeply human story beyond up-to-date that pushes the edge of the envelope," says Hayes. "Despite being parted, their relationship never stops developing and the story never loses the quintessential Koski and Falk."

Raymond Gaynor is the pen-name of a multi-award-winning, reclusive writer-artist- photographer-videographer, who, in his own words, "lives and breathes" San Francisco. He is co- author with William Maltese on the Tripler and Clarke gay political thriller, TOTAL MELTDOWN (Borgo/Wildside 2011) and is the author of numerous fiction and non-fiction works published under a number of pseudonyms. "When co-authoring a work, it's always first in my mind to preserve the first author's style and voice, which I believe readers will find well accomplished," says Gaynor. "A close second is to add significantly to the work, which was incredibly easy and fun when working with A. G. Hayes. I think this is reflected in the adventure's compelling yet clean, easy read. Love Koski and Falk. Who couldn't?"

QUANTUM DEATH (2016)
by A. G. Hayes with Raymond Gaynor
344 pp. - 5.25" x 8" Softcover Pocket Book
ISBN 978-0-9963255-3-0

Available directly from the publisher/printer with FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE WITHIN THE USA INCLUDING ALASKA AND HAWAII at https://mkt.com/savant-books-and-publications/item/quantum-death

Also available from Amazon.com at https://www.amazon.com/dp/0996325530, Savant Bookstore Honolulu at http://www.savantbookstorehonolulu.com/order-online.php, and fine bookstores everywhere.

Raymond Gaynor Co-author of
    QUANTUM DEATH (Savant 2016) by A. G. Hayes
Author website at http://garymartine.yolasite.com 

drjanik

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Reply with quote  #22 
An excellent description of editing and polishing between a Savant/Aignos author and editor. In addition, once the work is fully edited, polished and approved by our finicky Editor-in-Chief, Mr. David Shinsato, it goes to a professionally trained and certified proofreader for a final check. Only then, after creating a press release, author introduction and book release articles, and three professionally sculpted excerpts will Savant/Aignos actually release a work. 

We also make this chat available to authors during editing and polishing, to help develop and sharpen their chatting skills as well a pre-publicize their works. 

The interesting thing is that it works. Authors who religiously appear on our chat often end up being the ones who are best read, which translates into success whether you count success by number of reads or royalties. 

I'm particularly looking forward to seeing ONE NIGHT IN BANGKOK (Savant, in final preparation) out there and purchasing a copy for myself (I like to read something refreshing in-between editing/polishing rounds when I'm wearing my editor's hat) :-)
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #23 
Music has been a big influence on me, first when I started writing poetry and then as I began to write novels. A particular song can inspire me to write a story that accompanies the music, at least in my imagination it does. For example, my second novel, "The Brazilian" got its origin straight from an instrumental song by the band Genesis. I would listen to that music with my headphones on and I would imagine it being the backdrop to a great adventure. That's how that entire story came about. 

The same can be said about ONE NIGHT IN BANGKOK. Yes there was a popular song by Murray Head in the 80's by the same name, but what many people may not have known back then, there was an instrumental intro that was made to accompany that song but was never played on the radio. That particular piece would get my imagination flowing again,and I had tried to come up with a story to match it for many years, if not over a decade. A few years back, a fellow author friend of mine challenged me to write a trilogy. I accepted that challenge and started putting together an outline. I remembered my fondness for that tune that was the prelude to the song, One Night in Bangkok, and took it from there. I asked myself, "What if I wrote a trilogy where a man has one night in a different city for each story?" So, I started with Bangkok. Mums the word on where our hero winds up in parts 2 and 3! 😉

And no, I have never been to Thailand but my parents have. From all the research I did in writing this book, I know it is a place high on my list to travel to when the day comes. 
Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #24 
I'll drink to that! What many young authors today in their haste to be published forget is that readers only really remember the quality of the read, not how quickly the work emerged or how fancy the cover. It used to be that the storyline was everything, until the world of self-publishing appeared on the scene and vanity presses began publishing unedited works. The quality of the read today often severely compromises the storyline of a hastily published work. No wine before its time, I still say. 
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #25 
Very interesting excerpt there Raymond. I have QUANTUM DEATH on my 'to -read' list for certain. I like to see what other Savant authors have written, and that does sound good. Very excellent description as well.
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #26 
I think that's what makes Savant Books and Publications, and its imprint, Aignos Publishing special today. These days, I don't know of many small to medium sized publishing houses that "invest in their authors," i.e. don't charge for editing, polishing, proofreading, publicity or marketing. 
Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #27 
Thanks, Keith. You know, as an author, for birthdays and every year at holiday time I make my presents a book. A "real" book. One that has weight in your hand. And all of my book gifts come from the Savant/Aignos list. That way I not only help fellow Savant/Aignos authors, but hopefully, if they do the same, I help myself. Books are still high on most people's appreciated gift list, and they speak to the intelligence and humanism of the giver, so I can think of no better gift than a "real" book. 
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #28 
Agreed on both counts, Dan and Raymond. I for one am very grateful to be a part of Savant and have enjoyed the experience immensely thus far. And I very much appreciate the investment they have put into my work as well. I know this is only the beginning, so I'm very excited about it.
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #29 
I enjoyed the chat as always, gents. But duty calls and now I must go. Many thanks for hosting this, Dan. And very nice chatting with you as well, Raymond. Ya'll have a great weekend!
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #30 
Guess it's time for me to doff my Panama and put on my author's cap, currently a Na Koa Ikaika Maui baseball cap, bill backwards in the island style. In case you haven't heard of this baseball team (and I quote from Wikipedia here) "The Maui Strong Warriors) were an independent professional baseball team based out of Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii and champions of the Pacific Association of Professional Baseball Clubs. They made their debut in the 2010 season with the Golden Baseball League in an away game, visiting the Victoria Seals on May 21, 2010, and played their home games at Maehara Stadium in Wailuku on the island of Maui." Cool hat, really. 

Anyway, I'm currently working a manuscript tentatively entitled "The Sword of Kamehameha" which follows a 12th century samurai sword from Japan to Maui and its rediscovery on Oahu by two children, initiating a frenzy for ownership of the priceless weapon. It begins in 1260 A.D. Japan, when the first Shogun emerged in response to the threat of invasion by the Chinese Mongols under the Great Khan. The Maui portion is based on King David Kalakaua's published mele's one of which describes the shipwreck and salvage of five orientals and a "magical" sword off Maui in around 1260. I previously visited Nara and Kyoto, the seat of the Japanese Emperor's court. I just returned a couple days ago from Japan, where I continued my research on master sword making and the evolving government of Japan during the 13th century. I plan one more trip there to visit Kamekura, the home of the shogunates, before completing the manuscript. Personally, I find the research one of the most rewarding aspects of authoring. 
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