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MikeDavis1953

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Reply with quote  #16 
I have enjoyed your "Color-me-Please" books and I have encountered several people who have read those books and all the feedback has been positive.
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #17 
Doffing my editor's hat (I'm not actively editing anything at the moment, but anticipating editing Helen R. Davis' second in her Cleopatra series, "Cleopatra Victorious"), and putting on my occasional proofreader's hat, I'm thoroughly enjoying proofing A. G. Hayes' newest Koski and Falk adventure, THE SOLAR TRIANGLE (Savant, in preparation). This will be his seventh work published by Savant, and the sixth in the Koski and Falk series. 
HelenRuthDavis

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Reply with quote  #18 

CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED by Helen R. Davis - Excerpt #1 (This Excerpt is Family Rated)

[12607043-cleopatra-unconquered-by-helen-davis] 

 CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED (2015)
by Helen R. Davis
330 pp - 6" x 9" Softcover Trade Book
ISBN 978-0-9963255-2-3

 Available directly from the publisher/printer with FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE WITHIN THE USA INCLUDING ALASKA AND HAWAII at

http://www.savantbooksandpublications.com

 Also available from Amazon.com, Savant Bookstore Honolulu, as well as fine online and "brick and mortar" bookstores everywhere.

Helen R. Davis
Award-winning Author of CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED (Savant 2015)

drjanik

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Reply with quote  #19 
Doffing my proofreader's hat and putting on my author's hat, I have to say that authoring A WHALE'S TALE (Savant 2009) and THE TURTLE DANCES (Savant 2013) have been perhaps the high point of my authoring life. I never imagined myself a children's book author, but A WHALE'S TALE has proven to be one of our bestsellers. Last year, I wrote a a third "Color-Me-Please" manuscript entitled "The Gecko Sings" but it didn't pass muster with my most hardened critic, Ruth Janik, my illustrator and mother. :-) While A WHALE'S TALE begins a new life with translation into several foreign languages, I have returned to observing our house gecko, who is the unwitting source of my inspiration for, if not "The Gecko Sings" than another gecko-focus. And, yes, we always keep a house gecko to keep all the tropical insects at bay. 
jdcurrie

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Reply with quote  #20 
Dropping in from the clouds to join the discussion.  Good to see that Isla is dancing.  She's a very clever and curious turtle who somehow escaped the Great Gyre.
HelenRuthDavis

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hello JD!
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #22 
Aloha Helen,

Hope you don't mind me taking editor's license to add an image of the cover of CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED (Savant 2015) and tighten up the spacing on your excellent excerpt. I love this book, being a ancient-Egypt-and-Rome-o-phile. Your book stands alongside my collection by Mary Renault. I look forward to editing "Cleopatra Victorious" and hopefully also "Cleopatra Magnifica" which you've written. 
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #23 
Aloha Jim,

Great to hear from you. Your second work with Savant/Aignos, SADDAM'S PARROT (this one under Aignos Publishing), is already in proofing and should be coming out in June 2017! Tell our chat readers about it, please, including what inspired you to write it. 
jdcurrie

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Reply with quote  #24 
Just Jim but nice to connect with everyone.  I haven't dropped in for a long time--since In Dire Straits came out.   I had hoped to meet some of the Savant flock last year in Honolulu but the tides and current weren't right.
HelenRuthDavis

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Reply with quote  #25 
Yes, Dan. Don't forget CLEOPATRA TRIUMPHANT, the fourth book in the series!

Dan, you do flatter me. Little Helen R. Davis, in the company of Mary Renault? What an honor!
jdcurrie

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Reply with quote  #26 
Animals and parrots, in particular.  I used to live in the Bay Area and Berkeley where I went to grad school many years ago. 

Anyone see the film, The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill? It's the story of these cherry-head conures--formerly pet parrots who formed a flock around the Coit Tower. 

A second parrot influence was Alex, the remarkable (brilliant actually) African grey parrot studied by the cognitive scientist Irene Pepperberg.

It occurred to me that Alex somehow ended up with the wild parrots of Telegraph Hill.  Then imagined backstory kicked in--I realized that the Alex in my story was formerly Saddam Hussein's pet and confidant.  He knew all of Saddam's secrets and much more.  After his days with Saddam he was delivered as a spoil of war to the White House, but he escaped and ended up in San Francisco.

In the present the parrot "flew in" from Telegraph Hill, landing on the shoulder of beautiful elephant whisperer in North Beach.  Over time he started to spout secrets from the White House and Iraq.  The spouts became the subject of much mischief for a band of San Francisco creatives living by their wits.

drjanik

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Reply with quote  #27 
I've been asked several times what I'm currently writing, so here goes: 

"The Sword of Kamehameha" is continuing to emerge. I'm steeped in 13th century Japan still, awaiting a trip to Kamekura, Japan, to see first hand one of the places where the action takes place (i like to actually visit the places I write about it at all possible to capture their "feel"). I've got most of the 13th century Hawaii portion well researched and re-constructed in my head, and have begun scoping out the contemporary Hawaii portion where two children discover the sword and start the novel. 

"The Edge of Madness," that takes up where TOTAL MELTDOWN (Borgo/Wildside 2010) ends, is partly scoped out, awaiting illumination about several new technologies I see appearing in 2050 or beyond. I love technology, and in this work, I've focused strongly on medical technologies, like elective body sculpting (e.g. adding a prehensile tail). 

"Shadow," a novel about a seemingly psychotic physicist investigating the future integration of M-superstring Theory into contemporary human affairs (I've come to calling it "M-Supersting Theory"), continues to slowly evolve. Inserting M-Superstring theory into not just physics, but all the various aspects of our lives, like politics, medicine, psychology, business and the world's economy, is proving incredibly fun. 

"The Third Encounter," a fantasy science fiction work positing the reality of a meeting between then President Eisenhower and a group of aliens, and the intriguing ramifications of such a meeting, continues to slowly evolve into a thriller. I've talked with A. G. Hayes on several occasions about doing a joint-venture on this one, with Koski and Falk at the center, but that is still in discussion. 
MikeDavis1953

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Reply with quote  #28 
Yes, Helen and her friend Carolina have also written a "what-if" story about Isabella which I think she just submitted to Savant earlier today. The great thing about alternative universe histories is you can Monday morning quarterback what happened. But Then, you usually discover that whatever you "fix" in the historical record leads to a new set of issues. A concept that I was first exposed to in  "The Lathe of Heaven" by Ursula K. Le Guin. And I think you use that book in one or more of your courses, don't you Dan?
'
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #29 
Deja vu? Here on Oahu, we have a flock of iridescent green parrots that began as two turned loose, and now number maybe 40 or 50. They fly by my window early in the morning screeching their heads off, probably talking about Alex's newest squawks. :-)
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #30 
As for Berkeley, well, that's my old stompin' ground, too. When the ol' Island Fever grips me (usually after driving around the island the umpteenth time), I often reflect back to my Bay Area days. They were and remain some of my best. For me, it was the outstanding social opportunities, like hearing world-class scientists and authors, that fueled my interest. Hawaii is more laid back. 

As for Alex, what escaped spoil of war wouldn't eventually gravitate to the San Francisco Bay area? 
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