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HelenRuthDavis

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Reply with quote  #31 
Dad wasn't that in 2001? Or is there one you didn't tell me about?
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #32 
Living in Texas and having visited the Teass/Mexico border towns many times over the years, and having many friends from these areas, I am quite interested in reading ILLEGAL (Aignos 2018). It sounds like a riveting story for certain.
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #33 
I want to exchange my author hat momentarily for my publisher hat, just to mention Daniel Bradford's impending release, BO HENRY AT THREE FORKS (Savant, in preparation). It's Savant/Aignos' first Western, something I'm personally excited about (imagine me rummaging about in my closet for my old cowboy boots from my Texas days as I write this). Anyone else a Western fan? If so, how come Westerns have been so stable a genre over the years, not only in the USA but elsewhere in the world? 

Now that I think of it, isn't my comment about old cowboy boots cosplay? Anyone here into cosplay?
keithrees

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Reply with quote  #34 
I have to head out to get my little one to her gymnastics, so Happy New Year to everyone and I look forward to future chats. Happy reading and writing!  Thanks Dan!
Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #35 
I think the heart of a "Western" is personal freedom, a sub-topic often appearing in sci-fi and alt-hist genre works, and maybe all "enduring" literary works as well. It's something to do with our free spirit as a child spending the remainder of his or her days trying to fit into an increasingly obtuse adult world where there are many pressures to conform. Isn't that the heart of cosplay as well? 
HelenRuthDavis

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Reply with quote  #36 
Dan, cosplaying is fun. I have cospalyed as Terra Branford and Celes CHere, two of my favorite characters from the Final Fantasy series. I also wear the dresses on their own in spring and summer weather 😉
MikeDavis1953

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Reply with quote  #37 
Dear AJ,

I think that yes, alternate history is sci-fi without tying to explain why things are different. As we now see that environmental factors actually change how our DNA is translated into proteins, and all this quantum mechanical physics implies that information can move faster than light, we all need to stop and ponder what it all means. I have enjoyed all of your books and I look forward to seeing what Dan comes up with in his book. As I said earlier, the Hawaii incident prompted me  to relive my memories of the Cuban Missile Crisis and all those end of world books I read in my youth. The first alternate sci fi history I recall reading was "The Man in the High Castle"by Phillip Dick.
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #38 

A WHALE'S TALE by Daniel S. Janik - Excerpt #2 (Family Rated)

[10298558-newest-book] 

“Chapter 2 - The Big Top

     I think being born must be quite different for whales than people. You see, when we whales are born, we simply leave the small sea inside our mother for a bigger one on the outside. We don't cry, because, for us, it’s a change we eagerly look forward to, just as you might look forward to going for a walk in a new park, or shopping at a new toy store. On the other hand, there is one really big challenge for us; that’s when we move from the small sea inside our mother to the bigger sea surrounding her. Just like you, from the moment we are born we must breathe air, and, unlike most other sea animals who get their air right from the water, we whales, like you, cannot. For us, you see, breathing is not so easy.

     The hero of my story, a newborn whale, saw the water outside of his mother for the first time one early day in the human month of December. He was excited, and as you might imagine, a little frightened. This whale, like all newborn whales, held his breath, one, two, three, four... eight, nine, ten minutes, while his mother swam supportively beside him, singing, and encouraging him to take his first breath, slowly nudging him up towards the very top of the sea. 

     No, dear reader, our first breath isn't easy…”

——————————————

What are the book reviewer’s saying?

5 of 5 stars - “immersive...magically mesmerizing” - R. Sharpquill

5 of 5 stars - “Amazing...unique” - W. Peever (author of THE JUMPER CHRONICLES)

5 of 5 stars - “Fascinating” - W. Maltese (author of DARE TO LOVE IN OZ)

5 of 5 stars - “Mythic...archetypal” - O. Stucco (author of MY UNBORN CHILD)

HOLLYWOOD BOOK FESTIVAL AWARD

I wrote this book out of love for the gentle creatures that return every year from Alaska to Hawaii.  In the warm tropical waters, they have their babies and train them for the rigors of Alaska, presenting wonderful displays for patient whale-watchers - what we call in Hawaii “local TV.”  A WHALE’S TALE (Savant 2009) is the result of five years of whale observation.  As I write this, the whales are jumping not far from me, showing backs, tails, flukes and otherwise learning the life skills they will use when they return to their feeding grounds in the cold arctic.  

A WHALE'S TALE (Savant 2009)
92 pp.  8.25" x 5" Softcover
20 B&W "Color-Me-Please" Illustrations
ISBN 978-1442-105065

Daniel S. Janik
Multi-award-winning author of
     A WHALE'S TALE (Savant 2009)
        Available from Amazon.com at http://www.amazon.com/dp/1442105062
     THE TURTLE DANCES (Savant 2013)
         Available from Amazon.com at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0988664011

 
Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #39 

QUANTUM DEATH by A. G. Hayes with Raymond Gaynor- Excerpt #2 (This Excerpt is Restricted due to graphic content):

"Mr. Hempsted. It's Agent Falk," he said working his way through the door and cautiously around to the front of the chair. "I visited you earlier, and was wondering if we might…" 

Aaron Hempsted was sitting, head erect, rheumy bloodshot eyes fixed open, staring at Falk, his mouth limply agape, his unshaven face even whiter than before. A bloodless hand gripped each of the threadbare chair arms, making it appear as if he were pushing himself back into the seat. A small rivulet of dark, coagulated blood had worked its way alongside his nose and down one cheek from a small, round entry hole in the middle of his forehead. The man's shocked expression was accentuated by a halo of dark red blood splattered behind the man's resting head onto a white embroidered doily draped over the back of the easy chair. 

Falk squatted, raising his weapon and holding it with both hands as he swept the room…

[12541533-quantum-death-by-hayes-with-raymond-gaynor] 

Multi-award winning author A. G. Hayes studied television writing at UCLA and has published short fiction, "Cover up" - "Not a Penny Pincher” - "Home" - "Payment in Full" - "Small Wonder" - Fate Magazine-"Guided Through a Mine Field" and other scripts to CBS TV and other television productions. He lives in Northern California, and spends his time writing and traveling to nearly every part of the world. He has used personal experiences gained during service with the British intelligence in Eastern Europe and the Middle East to enrich the characters of his protagonist teams. "Quantum Death is a deeply human story beyond up-to-date that pushes the edge of the envelope," says Hayes. "Despite being parted, their relationship never stops developing and the story never loses the quintessential Koski and Falk." 

Raymond Gaynor is the pen-name of a multi-award-winning, reclusive writer-artist-photographer-videographer, who, in his own words, "lives and breathes" San Francisco. He is co-author with William Maltese on the Tripler and Clarke gay political thriller, TOTAL MELTDOWN (Borgo/Wildside 2011) and is the author of numerous fiction and non-fiction works published under a number of pseudonyms. "When co-authoring a work, it's always first in my mind to preserve the first author's style and voice, which I believe readers will find well accomplished," says Gaynor. "A close second is to add significantly to the work, which was incredibly easy and fun when working with A. G. Hayes. I think this is reflected in the adventure's compelling yet clean, easy read. Love Koski and Falk. Who couldn't?"

QUANTUM DEATH (2016)
by A. G. Hayes with Raymond Gaynor
344 pp. - 5.25" x 8" Softcover Pocket Book
ISBN 978-0-9963255-3-0

AMSTERDAM BOOK FESTIVAL AWARD

 WHAT THEY'RE SAYING ABOUT QUANTUM DEATH:

 4/5 Stars: "Quantum Death left me on the edge of my seat beginning to end" - Karen (Amazon Review)

 4/5 Stars: "for those who like intrigue, action, and mystery, yet are really more interested in the why did the event happen or what are the mechanics behind it" - Pandora (Amazon Review)

 3/5 Stars: "provide a very unique premise in a genre that, these days, is hard-pressed to come up with anything original" - William Maltese (Amazon Review)

 Available directly from the publisher/printer with FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE WITHIN THE USA INCLUDING ALASKA AND HAWAII at

https://mkt.com/savant-books-and-publications/item/quantum-death

Also available from Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, Savant Bookstore Honolulu, and fine bookstores everywhere.

Raymond Gaynor
Award-winning co-author of
   QUANTUM DEATH (Savant 2016) by A. G. Hayes

Author website at http://garymartine.yolasite.com/raymondgaynor.php

Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #40 
I have to admit that for years, I was a "trekkie" complete with original Star Trek uniform, which I wore to several Star Trek Conventions well before cosplay became what it is today--mostly anime character based. Maybe that reflects my intrigue with technology and my bent for writing techno thrillers like QUANTUM DEATH (Savant 2016). If co-author A. G. Hayes were on today's chat, I wonder what he would say. Isn't pretty much everything we do as adults really cosplay at heart?
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #41 
My own experience with cosplay is more restricted to Halloween, a holiday I've always celebrated exuberantly. Over the years, I've been Michael Jackson, Zorro, an astronaut, a 1940's noir detective, and, yes, even a Star Trek crew member. Regarding the latter, my most memorable moment was meeting a pair of fully costumed Klingons in the men's room at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas when they were hosting Star Trek. It was, perhaps the most intimidating experience of my life. :-)
MikeDavis1953

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Reply with quote  #42 
I grew up on the original Star Trek and to a lessor extent Star Wars. In graduate school I discovered the delightfully weird take on sci-fi of "Dr. Who" whose TARDIS combined both space and time travel along with the British ability to never take themselves too seriously and who can resist those man destroying vacuum cleaners, the Daleks?
HelenRuthDavis

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Reply with quote  #43 

CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED by Helen R. Davis - Excerpt #2 (This Excerpt is Family Rated)

  [12515785-helen-davis-cleopatra-unconquered-savant-2015] 

 

"Cleopatra Elder particularly enjoyed sitting with her youngest daughter, reading aloud the stories and history of ancient Egypt in Egyptian from scrolls taken from the famous Library of Alexandria to the wide-eyed youth. She read to her in Greek about the country they ruled, and about glories of Greece, especially Macedonia where the Ptolemaic Dynasty had originated, and in Latin of contentious Rome, the newest empire and Egypt's current principal debt-holder. From earliest age, Cleopatra VII Philopater also heard of her personal protector, the Goddess Isis. When the Queen Mother tired, she would have her teenage maid, Charmion, a beautiful, ebony-colored Nubian slave who would later become Queen Cleopatra VII's personal maid and cosmetic advisor, recite hymns and sing praises in Egyptian to Isis. The first day she saw the young princess, Charmion fashioned an image of Isis made of soft cloth and dressed Egyptian-style in a linen sheath dress, along with a baby that attached to Isis' arm, meant to represent the both the Goddess' mythical son, Horus, and, at the same time, her newest daughter, Cleopatra Younger."

 

What reviewers and book festivals are saying: (pending)

 

Based on the PACIFIC RIM BOOK FESTIVAL AWARDED manuscript

 

Helen Davis has a long interest in history, religion, politics, and all nations. She has studied the ancient world through the gift of books since a very young age, her passion for this era kindled long ago. She has also researched and studied many other times and eras and has a passion for strong women who have governed nations from the past to the present.

 

"Cleopatra's story has been sensationalized to the point where she is has become as much legend and myth as history," says Davis. "In writing this story about what our world might have been like had she and Mark Antony won the dreadful Battle at Actium, it is my hope that readers will begin to appreciate her genius and ultimate impact on the world. The novel begins with a largely historical account of her life, and ends with her, unconquered, after the decisive Battle at Actium. The story is one about triumphing over insurmountable obstacles. It is my sincere hope that this first book in my Cleopatra serieswill be a fun and enlightening read—one that readers won't want to put down."

 

CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED (2015)

by Helen R. Davis

330 pp - 6" x 9" Softcover Trade Book

ISBN 978-0-9963255-2-3

 

Available directly from the publisher/printer with FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE WITHIN THE USA INCLUDING ALASKA AND HAWAII at

http://www.savantbooksandpublications.com

 

Also available from Amazon.com, Savant Bookstore Honolulu, and fine bookstores everywhere.

 

Helen R. Davis

Award-winning Author of CLEOPATRA UNCONQUERED (Savant 2015)

Author website at http://helendavisbooks.org/en/

Author Raymond Gaynor

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Reply with quote  #44 
Mike, you've really taken this chat to the next level with your mention of the "Dr. Who" series, which I regard as UK's version of Star Trek. Not only is it pure sci-fi (perhaps with a bit of complete fantasy combined what with this vacuum cleaner Dakeks) but it's "tongue-in-cheek" as well. The British ability to simultaneously explain, pontificate, laugh at oneself and, yes, cosplay to the max is truly amazing. I'm looking forward to the the Doctor's first female incarnation. What a great twist on today's gender-bending world.  
drjanik

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Reply with quote  #45 
Speaking of television and movies, I wonder how other authors feel about the shift from reading to watching.
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